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20131202
20131210
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 10:00pm EST
for the release of a man the symbol of the civil rights movement. finally he walked out of prison. four years later he was elected south africa's first president. let's examine the man behind the status. our first guest had a strong connection. his grandfather taught mandela and his grandmother visited the south african leader in prison. it's a pleasure to have you here. i know you are the headmaster of the groten school. i'm glad you took time on what must be a hard day, given the family connections you had and you know him yourself. >> thank you for having me, i'm honoured to be here and i thank groten school for allowing me to be here. the man would have loved that. >> tell me about your family and connections to nelson mandela. >> my grandfather taught nelson mandela in college in social anthropology. they belonged to the anc, the same organization. my grandmother was also a political leader within the anc. >> and your grandmother then also was close to him and visited him in prison, and nelson mandela wrote her. >> several times, and my grandmother would write back. she told me she wrote
MSNBC
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm PST
john lewis, democrat of georgia and civil rights leader. mr. lewis, thank you for being with us here tonight on this historic day. >> thank you very much, rachel, for having me, and thank you nar rich history, telling the story, what happened and how it happened. it is very moving. >> i have to ask, after your long career, especially as a young man in the south, in the american civil rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work inform your own? what has he meant to you over the years? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> well, the leadership, the vision, the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said, if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle and when i met him for the first time. he said to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what
MSNBC
Dec 8, 2013 11:00pm PST
. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guest, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend jesse jackson is here, one of the
MSNBC
Dec 8, 2013 11:00am PST
, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guests, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. joining me charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend
NBC
Dec 9, 2013 3:00am PST
was a protest against apartheid. >> and it's interesting, he being too young for the civil rights era, reverend jackson, but first to charles ogletree, this was the connection point was apartheid. this was the inspiration nelson mandela, who he could experience realtime, the joy of that deliverance realtime. >> that's exactly right. i was a student at stanford when i heard the movement about divestment from south africa in 1972. in 1971, barack obama was only ten years old so he was very young and never able to appreciate that. what i want to make clear, though, we shouldn't call him militant, we shouldn't call him a terrorist, he's a patriot. he's just like the patriots fighting here many, many centuries ago for equality. and that's what he was. he was a patriot who tried to make sure that his country where he was born, where he controlled would recognize the fact that the majority of people who were african were suppressed by the minority of people who were white, and that has to be changed. he is a patriot who did a great deal in his 27 years in prison and did a great deal as president and c
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 3:00am PST
's incomparable. one of us that grew up in the post-civil rights era it tempered a lot of us that got to know him. the mandela way was not only to fight for change but become the change and he symbolized that in epic proportions. few times i was honored to be around him, you were always moved by this balance of gravity and humility, you never saw in anyone else. he was such a humble and great guy at the same time. it is really something that we probably, president obama said, we'll never see again. >> john meacham, i was talking to my 10-year-old girl about nelson mandela, explaining about him, what he had done, the sacrifices he made, the way he changed this country and the world. i'm wondering, though, of course, my 10-year-old girl didn't know an awful lot about nelson mandela. and we won't even talk about my 5-year-old boy. he'll get it in years to come. what do history books write about this man? >> the last lines of the 20th century. he was arguably with john paul ii, martin luther king, he was someone without whom the world would be radically different and worse. while america mourns him t
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 9:00am PST
in america, so much of the american civil rights movement was reminding african-americans and still is, reminding young children of color, you are equal, you do deserve the exact same things. i think that made a huge difference. >> i think part of that was if you understand he was born in royalty. he was born to a certain manner. his self-concept, he that naturally and he never lost it. because he didn't have that insecurity, he didn't need all that to become a leader. his vanity never outran his sanity. >> talking about the legacy of nelson mandela, we're talking about how those qualities of grace, dignity, humility have been inherited or visited on later generations. i want to play an excerpt from your interview with the president last night where he himself takes a remarkably humble posture as far as being commander in chief, president of the united states. lets take a listen to that. >> the interesting thing about now having been president for five years. it makes you humbler as opposed to cockier as to what you as an individual can do. you recognize you're just part of the sweep o
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2013 7:00am PST
, the '60s is a movement, the years of civil rights movement, the '80s, south africa, anti-apartheid activism, i think there was both but it was so riveting and real. even back to sharkville and the killing of 69 people, the kids in '76 in soweto. high school and elementary school children who are gunned down. it's tallas power of the images. you talked about nelson mandela. we did not see him for decades because they forbid his pic churs or voice from being heard. now we have the pictures from south africa. when you have children being gunned down, that is very hard to talk about. >> when we come back, what happened when ted cruz try day friday -- tried to remember nelson mandela this week. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our com
CBS
Dec 8, 2013 5:00pm PST
they needed to hear. he would come to the united states and with the u.s. civil rights movement then he brought it home. as a result now, south africa which still has troubles, still has 30% unemployment, which this rainbow nation doesn't exactly exist the way we like to think it does, is now left in -- with the absence of him to look in the hire current and future leaders realizing nobody quite measures up. partly because the goals were different. the ideals are different. the challenges are different. the economy is still struggling. will never see the likes of nelson mandela again. maybe neither should we. perhaps he was a man of his time. the question i guess now especially for all the young people, they call them born free, born after he was no longer president. he was one term as president which was another smart thing. >> one of the few african leaders who stepped down willingly. very few people in that position say, know what, i'm done. i'll move on to something else. >> schieffer: one of the few leaders, i mean you look where they sometimes have to take them out on a gurney kn
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 12:00am PST
of americans compared south africa to the u.s. and thought in terms -- >> jim crow. >> the civil rights movement, where people's rights were being violated. in south africa, there was no constitution and there were no rights. so apartheid was really a labor system, a way of controlling black workers to the benefit of the people who owned the mines and the resources of that country. and so the whole system regulated people's lives, almost in every dimension, where they could live, where they could work, and they couldn't violate those rules. they couldn't be in the city after dark. they couldn't, you know, work in certain areas. it was a tightly regulated, really a fascist, to use a word that we don't use much anymore. it's that kind of a white nationalist regime. >> i mean, there were -- and we should just say, there were secret police. during nelson mandela's imprisonment, it was illegal to have a picture of him, right? these are -- >> it's all true, chris. >> it couldn't put it in a newspaper. they couldn't put his face or name in a newspaper. >> a lot of us forget that the united sta
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2013 8:45am EST
in charge. we saw that here in this country post-civil rights movement where -- there's a wonderful book i think about often about a small town and southern georgia, the civil rights movement came late to the county and those who sort of really were in opposition to the sheriff and ultimate power, how difficult, difficulty they had once they had any kind of power. and so i guess i wonder why, what happened? >> it's the big question in a place like this. obviously, people came back from 30 years in exile come in the case of the successor to nelson mandela in 1999. mostly living in london. and all of a sudden in charge of running a country that he didn't know that he left as a young man of 19, coming back and needing to run the place that was bankrupt the he described former president described walking into the office in union buildings after being sworn in and finding nothing. no computers, no pencils, no pins. no paper, and which to manage this developing country. so i think part of it is that that generation came back from exile to a country they did know. and that the presidency is in ha
MSNBC
Dec 7, 2013 5:00am PST
civil rights movement and then he was on the side of civil rights and then it got all complicated with affirmative action and bussing and sanctions he said made it all clear again. he stood up again against the president. i was covering the white house then and occasionally they would bring in small groups of reporters to chat with the president on the theor theory w each other. it was during this period the president said more black people drive and own cars in south africa than there are cars in the soviet union and to him that sort of rationalized, this was, you know, communism is the evil system. and you had po to do everything to stand up to communism. i remember clearly he reached for two cookies and said he had half a sandwich for lunch. pat buchanon was a speech writer in the white house then. i recalled this memory to him. he said he wrote that lean. he got it from commentary magazine. he said reagan loved it but the secretary of state george schultz was furious at him for putting it in. it made if president look like simpleton. >> but that was a part, anything that could
Al Jazeera America
Dec 5, 2013 6:00pm EST
who became a towering symbol for civil rights for strength, for unity.
Al Jazeera America
Dec 8, 2013 8:00pm EST
inspiration from him during the civil rights days here in america, and they prayed for him and gave him their support all those years when he was in prison. and, of course, it was a big event here when only a few months after he got out of prison, he came to visit this church. it does beg the question how you memorialize this man in just one sermon. we spoke earlier to senior pastor j. edgar boyd? >> i he dismantled with the prison cell with the help of those here in america and other parts of the world, the giant, the you know grateful and the wronged giant of apartheid. he disassembled it and brought about hope, and it brought about liberation not only for himself but for peace-loving people throughout south africa. >> new mexico new mexico had been out of the public eye for many years before he died but there are parishioners here who met him and we spoke to one of them? >> what a blissing it meet in gentleman, more than anything in life, the one who told us to forgive. the hardest thing to do in life is to forgive. he told us to forgive. no forgive and move on. yes, et cetera my her
CBS
Dec 8, 2013 6:00am PST
of the most influential leaders and revolutionaries. along with our own civil rights leader dr. martin luther king, junior. among others on the list, presidents theodore roosevelt and ronald reagan, winston churchill and margaret thatcher, pope john paul ii and israel's first prime minister david bengoria. adolph hitler and mao. "time" went on to name the last century's three greatest people. >> the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> osgood: runner up for franklin d. roosevelt and muhammad gandhi who led india's campaign against british colonialism. >> it is complete independence that we want. >> ghandi inspired among many others, nelson mandela who praised him in an essay for "time." growth ghandi and i suffered colonial oppression, and both of us mobilized our respected peoples against government, is that violated our freedoms. when it came to choosing the greatest figure of the 20th century, "time" looked beyond politics to choose albert einstein, the scientist who derived the equation e equals mc squared. a choice defended by walter isaacson. >> he said politics is for the mome
MSNBC
Dec 9, 2013 3:00pm PST
a pivotal moment in civil rights history that happened on this day 60 years ago. the landmark brown versus the board of education decision of 1954 declared that separate public schools for black and white students were unconstitutional. an important part of that decision was the one that applied to washington, d.c. and six decades ago today two lawyers argued the washington, d.c. portion of the case. their argument, school segregation was a violation of liberty. the decision would have a direct impact on the first high school in the country, dunbar high school in washington, d.c. opened in 1870 and despite being segregated, it developed ground breaker after ground breaker. including george hayes. one of the lawyers who argued the case. and charles hamilton houston, the lawyer known as the man who killed jim crow. this year a great book chronicles the school in "first class: the legacy of dunbar, america's first black public high school." joining me now is the author allison stewart. allison, thanks for being here. >> i am thrilled to be here. >> let's start 60 years ago today. they argued
MSNBC
Dec 6, 2013 6:00pm PST
various black factions. and the white right wing goes to great lengths to disrupt the negotiations. >> mandela really believed the country was potentially on the brink of civil war. >> reporter: the violence peaks on easter sunday 1993 when a high-ranking anc member is shot outside his home by a white right-wing polish immigrant. >> there was uproar in the country. riots. >> reporter: the country finds itself in a moment of crisis. de klerk and the government are unable to keep the peace. there was only one man who could pull the nation back from the abyss. mandela addresses the country on national television. >> tonight why i'm reaching out to every single south african, black and white, now is the time for all south africans to stand together. >> only he could control the country in a crisis. and effectively, he was president from then on. de klerk was eclipsed. >> reporter: negotiations proceed, building towards a momentous event. >> the first time they were called for dignity was on the 7th of april, 1994. >> reporter: for the first time in its almost 400-year history, south af
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2013 6:00pm EST
in this way. >> i follow on exactly from the comments of the right honorable member and her reminiscence but also her mild remonstrance, which is absolutely well made, that we are talking here about a politician. certainly in the civil encounters with president mandela in one capacity, and with mr. mandela post-presidency in other capacities, not only was his sense of humor telling, but so was the self-deprecating use to which he put that humour, lest there was any thought that a political halo could be bestowed upon him. he certainly did not want that, and he would not want that to be part of his legacy today. i mention humor because my first introduction to nelson mandela was far from fortuitous. he was then president, and enormous numbers of parliamentarians had somehow all descended on south africa at the same time. they had come from new zealand, australia, here, ireland, france all on fact-finding missions. it was interesting that these fact-finding missions all coincided with the rugby world cup that was taking place in south africa. given that there were more visiting foreign pol
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)